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When Is The Best Time To Fix a Leaky Basement and With What System?

Leaking basements are a very common phenomenon is most homes. A leaking basement could be due to a number of factors including natural occurrences and faulty home structures, but no matter what the cause of your leaking basement is, simple pre-emptive leaky basement solutions can help to avoid major troubles. Leaky basements are mostly caused by water soil pressure around the home’s foundation. It could either be due to hydrostatic pressure or lateral pressure.

Lateral Pressure

Lateral pressure is when the surface soil around the foundation of a home absorbs water during normal weather conditions. Instead of the water to drain, it stays afloat due to the nature of the soil. This slow drainage causes sideways pressure against the foundation of the home. Then it creates problems such that you would need leaky basement solutions to fix it. Clay soil is especially prone to flooding.

Hydrostatic Pressure

Naturally, there’s always water in the ground no matter how dry it feels on the surface. However, some areas have low levels of water than other areas. This type of water that exists in the ground is known as the water table. The location of the water table in every area is however different. Proximity of the water table to large bodies of water like rivers and lakes sometimes determines the height of the water table.

Where there is heavy rain or snowmelt, the soil that is closer to the surface absorbs some water while the surface of the water is saturated because the water table rises and more water cannot be absorbed. This rise in the water table causes what is known as hydrostatic pressure against the foundation of the home so that water begins to leak into the basement.

Signs it’s Time to Fix Your Leaky Basement

It’s always best to opt for pre-emptive leaky basement solutions and fix your basement before it starts to leak. A few signs can help you know when it’s time to fix your basement.

Basement Dampness

One of the first tell-tale signs that your basement needs leaky basement solutions is basement dampness. If you discover that the walls and floors of your basement are sometimes wet or cold, then it is a sign that water is somehow getting into your foundation.

Efflorescence

If you notice some white powdery substances on the floors or walls of your basement, it is a sign that efflorescence has occurred. Efflorescence happens when water evaporates and leaves a crystallized substance behind. So sometimes, you may not see the water or wetness but efflorescence would be able to let you know that water was once in that area.

Other signs of a leaking basement include wet stains on the floor or walls of the basement, funny smells in the basement and basement stains.

 

You can fix a leaky basement in a number of ways but the most common methods include buying a sump pump, which is a machine that could be used to pump out excess water from the basement and leaky basement solutions offered by professionals. For more information see: How to Choose the Right Wet Basement Waterproofing Method

 

Aquatech Waterproofing is a Canadian based company that offers free consultation on leaky basement solutions. For a free consultation, visit here.

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How Basement Waterproofing Can Rescue a Leaky Basement

Homeowners often have this problem of a damp, wet and leaky basement. The whole house can be affected over time when water keeps on entering a basement. The damage that water can cause to a foundation ranges from mild to severe. It can also create other problems with mildew and harmful molds — especially for adults and children who have problems with breathing including Asthma. You should be aware of the important reasons why stopping basements leaks can help prevent problems associated with water and moisture:

Water Damages All Types of Basements

There are several purposes that basements serve including storage, additional living space, work space and a play area for children. Basements are used only as a place of storage in some homes, while in other homes, basements are used as fully furnished living spaces, with no difference from any other existing living space in the home. All the same, the way you’ve chosen to use your basement still does not change the fact that water can be an annoying disturbance if it enters your basements.

Location, Location, Location

A basement can and will leak because of many different reasons. A common way basements give problem is when water continually seeps into the basement through small and hidden holes or cracks in the walls, joints or floor boards.

Basements are wet and damp by nature, and this is because they’re positioned below ground, close to sources of water and moist soil. Although some homeowners think that using a dehumidifier, which rids the air of excess moisture, is the only way to dry out the moisture and dampness of their basement, the source of the problem is not attacked by this process!

Drainage

Basement water issues can also be caused by drainage systems around the home. Water can easily backup or freely flow into your home’s basement in cases where the drainage system is improperly installed, damaged or clogged. Maintaining and keeping drains clear, or installing a new drainage system are easy ways to fix this problem.

Outdoor Leaks

When homeowners fail to maintain frequently outside spigots and leaky pipes, they tend to drip and leak, and this results in dampness and moisture issues in the basement. As a result of this, homeowners are advised to shut off water to the outside spigots during the winter season. This will protect the pipes from freezing, cracking and breaking, and prevent your basement from getting unnecessarily moist.

Another easily overlooked and common leak is through the basement windows in the home. When the rain or snow fall is too much, drainage problems can occur. This is because the windows tend to leak at ground level where the precipitation is building.

This issue can be countered by installing newer energy efficient replacement windows.

The Lack of Waterproofing

When an unfinished basement is not waterproofed, this can be the greatest problem. It’s okay not to complete the basement like everyone wants. But, no one wants a basement that is messy, damp, and leaky. You can have these very conditions if you don’t call in a basement expert to inspect the basement environment and properly waterproof the basement.

The contractor will likely recommend installing a water drainage system in the floor and a sump pump to properly redirect unwanted water out and away from the foundation.

Whether you have a finished or unfinished basement, waterproofing is important if you want to keep it healthy, safe, and dry.  But waterproofing should be done before completion because you can cover up the problem and only worsen it as time progresses when you complete it first. Also, your finished basement could build up some huge damages if waterproof materials or materials resistant to water damage are not used in finishing it. Somehow, when you use these kinds of products and materials to finish your basements, you’re actually waterproofing it too!

Make sure you keep these tips in mind if you practice do-it-yourself or just a concerned homeowner. But, it’s always wise to get a basement waterproofing expert who can evaluate the situation, offer the best options to meet the needs of your home and ensure that the installation is performed correctly to have your home protected.

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Duckbill Check Valve Design And Backflow Prevention

The design of check valves permits fluid to flow through a pipeline system or port in just a direction. The valves react; this means that the amount and the pressure of the fluid present in the system environment activate them. Typical uses of these valves include backflow prevention applications, wastewater treatment entities, and flood prevention situations.

This check valve can stand out as an obvious option to flapgate valves. A duckbill-shaped inner elastomer sleeve that responded keenly to changes in fluid pressure was one of the features of this new valve. A tight seal that blocked debris from entering waterways is formed when the valve sleeve closes in response to backflow pressure.

Upon further testing, the duckbill-shaped design was also proven to offer superior performance in trapping pollutants, durability, the stopping of leakage, and various self-cleaning abilities. Routinely, the duckbill elastomer check valve is used in waterway applications and backwater prevention. A tightly closed position can regularly be gotten from the curved shape of the interior valve bill, and this offers an excellent seal against debris in backflow applications. Various designs of different duckbill models allow for low-pressure applications and efforts that prevent pollution on larger waterways.

How does a check valve work?

Check valves are engineered to react to discrepancies in pressure. In the life cycle of the valve, there are times when the pressure of the fluids running through the valve is higher than the pressure in the valve mechanism. The force that upstream water generates results in a high differential pressure across the internal valve body, and then the valve opens and allows forward streams to pass through. However, the differential pressure in the whole valve body can be lowered by back-flowing water, thus the duckbill elastomer valve flexes close, sealing debris out.

Modern valves are designed to respond to simple pressure variations. From forward- or backflow, these newer valves react to little changes in differential pressure, and this makes them useful in different environments. Unlike disc check valves and other check valves that have metal components, the duckbill elastomer valves do not require very high maintenance – they don’t have interior metal parts that can become corroded or get rusted.

For what applications might check valves be used?

Duckbill valves can be employed for different applications such as in a variety of wastewater, stormwater, and backflow prevention applications.

Duckbill valves are also efficient for different other applications too. Some models are installed to control sewer systems and prevent sewer backflow. Others are ideal for manhole and end-of-pipe outfall installations. While others are used for storm water control like the retail store case, the study illustrates; or, for wastewater treatment applications. Particular duckbill models can be used in industrial applications, such as corrosive slurry handling, harsh chemical applications, and high-temperature chemical reactions.

Duckbill check valves have a design and structure that allow them to be widely applicable in environments of pressured fluid. The elastomer design requires low-maintenance, it is also rust-free, and its responsiveness to very subtle pressure changes across line fluid is high. Power sources or any exterior action to operate are not required by these valves. And this has made them highly versatile and highly durable.

 

If you are having problems with blackflow and require prevention against water damage, contact Aquatech Waterproofing today: 1-866-891-1917

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Top Tips for Preventing Basement Flooding

The time may come when you’ll have to handle the common problem of flooding if you have a basement. Although flooding is a common issue in houses that have basements, it is a serious one too. Real and negative consequences can result from basement flooding, and these consequences can have critical effects on your life, your home, and your health.

Let’s take for example:

  • Respiratory problems have been linked to houses that are continually wet from flooding.
  • Your home, as well as the personal items in your basement that are most likely not insured, can be permanently damaged by frequent flooding.
  • There’s a high possibility for your rate to increase if your insurance always compensates you for damage caused by flooding.
  • And when you decide to sell your home, you may find that your property value has significantly reduced because of frequent basement flooding.

Some issues can cause basement floodings like drainage failure, poor lot drainage, cracks in your foundation or basement walls, sump pump failure, and overflowing downspouts. And whatever the cause maybe, preventing flooding in your basement is critical in ensuring that your home, wallet and health are safe.

Tips for Preventing Flooding in Your Basement

  • Plumbing Maintenance– You should inspect your plumbing thoroughly at least once or twice a year, to make sure that there are no leaks in the pipes and that all of the industrial fasteners are secure. Other things that you should also inspect are your backwater valves, sump pump, and floor drains. It is wise to hire a professional to do the inspection for you if you are not sure of what you are looking for, so you can be sure of safety.
  • Backup Sump Pump– When a power failure occurs, your sump pump may stop working and pack up. However, you can save yourself from a flooding disaster in your basement by getting a backup sump pump that runs on batteries. These backup pumps are usually positioned just at the side of your main pump.
  • Furnishings– It is best to be prepared for all situations since you can’t prevent all of them. Make sure all of your furniture has legs long enough to keep the fabric and cushions from becoming wet just in case a flood occurs. You can also make use of ceramic tiles on the walls to reduce the degree of damage that may arise and to make cleanup very easy. Also, instead of carpet, consider area rugs. They can be easily removed and cleaned in the event of a flood.
  • Downspouts– Downspouts can often cause flooding in your basement if they are not positioned in the right location or if the eaves troughs they are attached to are full of leaves and debris. Be sure to clean the eaves troughs often and to check all the nuts and bolts that hold them together so that water can run to the downspout without difficulty. Also, examine to be sure that the downspout is placed in such a manner that it does not faces the foundation and doesn’t drain water right against the home as well.
  • Window Wells– It is common for basements have window wells that allow sunlight into the basement and offer additional exits from the home in case of emergency. But it is quite unfortunate that these wells can also turn into holding grounds for water which can damage the seals on your windows till they begin to leak. Fortunately, we can fix this problem with just a few fasteners and bolts. Install covers over your window wells to redirect rainwater away from the well and your foundation by making use of screws, nails, and bolt fasteners.

Consider these tips to reduce the possibilities of flooding or entirely prevent it if you are having issues with basement flooding.